Chemistry: Energy Shell Peace Flags – II

This is the ultimate follow-up to the previous Chemistry/Art/Peace lesson called Chemistry: Energy Shell Peace Flags. Before you can attempt the rest of this lesson, you’ll need to see how this is done… click here.

Recently, some middle school students got in on the process of making these and chose which elemental groups they wanted to work on (metals, non-metals, noble gases, etc.) This is a work in progress as our goal is to try to finish as many of the elements off of the periodic table as possible.

The higher the valence shells we achieved, the more we realized that the stars were no longer going to fit! By the time we got to Phosphorus (P), we knew it was time.

We had to get pretty resourceful once we ran out of space for the stars to act as the electrons.

After one brainstorming session and only a couple of mishaps, our resourcefulness and persistence paid off! We decided to use various sized beads… Here’s how it turned out. We hope you think it’s as cool as we do!

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Materials:

  1. watercolor paper – cut into sixths
  2. liquid watercolor
  3. salt
  4. medium-sized paintbrush
  5. wax-resist sticks (or white crayon)
  6. beads
  7. glue
  8. periodic table of elements chart
  9. energy level shells chart (ACS Middle School Chemistry has a GREAT tutorial and chart for this: LINK)
  10. Bohr’s Model three part cards: I’ve had these cards for eons, and scoured the internet looking for the link just for this post. After a couple of hours of looking, I finally realized that I had gotten the idea from Eclectic Living’s Montessori chemistry post, and had followed her idea in copying and pasting the diagrams into a document from ChemicalElements.com‘s website.
Phosphorus was our last element using stars.
Phosphorus was our last element using stars.

A ton of beads.
A ton of beads.
Sulfur. These cards were extremely helpful!
Sulfur. These cards were extremely helpful!
Squirt a small amount of tacky or Elmer's glue on the shell where you want your beads. Then place the beads on the glue.
Squirt a small amount of tacky or Elmer’s glue on the shell where you want your beads. Then place the beads on the glue.

We went through the box of beads and chose which beads we wanted for each element. Some were the same general color, some were mismatched.
We went through the box of beads and chose which beads we wanted for each element. Some were the same general color, some were mismatched.

Our workspace - three to four people working in the same spot can get pretty messy, but we got into a rhythm and it flowed beautifully!
Our workspace – three to four people working in the same spot can get pretty messy, but we got into a rhythm and it flowed beautifully!
The end result was awesome! We'll still be working on the others to complete out Periodic Table of Elements Peace Flags, but I think they needed a little break from it - me too!
The end result was awesome! We’ll still be working on the others to complete out Periodic Table of Elements Peace Flags, but I think they needed a little break from it – me too!

I would LOVE to see your results – even if it’s just a few elements. 


About Miranda

* Pisces. Eclectic. Indigo. Mother. Wife. Teacher. Herbalist. Scientist. Fantasy. Outdoors. Ocean. Crafty. Dreamer. * Found out more in the About section.

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